Tags: community service

Please note that some publications and departmental websites have not yet been updated for the current incoming class. Publications will continue to be updated throughout the summer.

Tags: community service extracurriculars opportunities social life sports

Being a member of the Princeton Athletics community has influenced the entirety of my Princeton experience in an extremely positive manner. As a member of the varsity softball team, I have had the opportunity to compete at the highest level while pursuing a world-class education. This combination allows student-athletes to balance athletic passions with academic goals while developing as leaders in the community.

Princeton’s 37 varsity teams operate under the motto “Achieve, Serve, Lead.” These three pillars are central to life as a Princeton student-athlete. Princeton Athletics has an incredible tradition of excellence and success. Since 1956, Princeton has won 452 Ivy League Championships, far more than any other Ivy League...

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Tags: community service health support

The Department of Public Safety (DPS). Usually the first thing new students and their parents ask me is if the campus is safe? However, you may also be curious about what we do, who we are and the reason we are important to you once you arrive on campus. Although I want to tell you all about our dedicated professional staff of University police officers, security officers, dispatchers and fire officials you can read about us on our website. You can also learn about our Community Caretaking mission and philosophy.

Even though we have a very safe campus, I think it’s important for me to take a few minutes of your time to share safety and security...

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Tags: community service opportunities

Photo of Bridge Year China Cohort

By Claire Ashmead ‘17

Claire Ashmead is a senior at Princeton University studying history and pursuing certificates in East Asian Studies, Humanistic Studies, and Creative Writing. Prior to her freshman year, Claire participated in Princeton University’s Bridge Year Program in China, volunteering with Yunnan Environmental Development Institute (YEDI), an organization that monitors and researches water management in Yunnan. Bridge Year is a tuition-free program open to incoming Princeton students, with placement opportunities in Bolivia, Brazil, China, India, and Senegal. While abroad, participants study the local language, live with carefully...

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Tags: community service diversity extracurriculars first generation friends opportunities social life support

Growing up in Queens, New York I was lucky to live in a predominantly South Asian neighborhood with a mosque down the block. Community and faith were intertwined and I never questioned why I was Muslim or why I should continue being Muslim. Instead I embraced my Muslim identity openly and threw myself into all the things I could find that had “Islam” or “Muslim” attached to its name. As a result I found wonderful friends and mentors and discovered many things that I’m passionate about, but each experience sparked more complicated questions about why and what I believe that I felt severely ill-equipped to answer. It was harder to find a spiritual connection to God than it was to continue going through the motions and keeping up...

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Tags: arts community service diversity extracurriculars friends opportunities social life support

Welcome to Princeton! As you start your path to Princeton, we encourage you to make service a part of your Princeton experience! The Pace Center for Civic Engagement helps Princeton students learn how to do service well and have a positive impact in the community. Through sustained volunteering, community immersion, student advocacy and activism, summer internships and post-graduate fellowships, you can get involved in so many ways.

At the Pace Center, we co-lead LEAP (Learning Enrichment in the Arts Program), a ...

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Tags: community service dining diversity extracurriculars friends social life

The Eating Clubs neighboring Princeton’s campus occupy a unique niche among the University’s many traditions. As private, off campus institutions, they were formed in the late 1800s in direct response to a lack of dining options available to juniors and seniors. Employing ingenuity typical of Princetonians, students pooled their resources and established relationships with local boarding houses to provide their meals. As the numbers of students collectively eating in these houses increased, undergraduates collaborated to buy or rent houses of their own, establishing the Eating Clubs we know today. Over time, these became not only the primary dining option for juniors and seniors, but assumed a key role in the social aspect of...

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